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MassDOT June Board Meeting

Wednesday, June 19
MBTA Board Room
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Full Meeting Schedule

On the Trans Blog

Swedish Transportation Team Views MassDOT Projects

Swedish Transport Administration officials visiting Massachusetts this month received a tour and briefing from MassDOT project managers on the site of award-winning work performed along Route 2 in Charlemont following Tropical Storm Irene in 2011.

MassDOT welcomed the Swedish delegation along with a student group from the College of Atlantic on the site visits, organized by the Massachusetts Division of Ecological Restoration.

View the entire
Swedish Transportation Team
blog post.


05/31/2013

Real Time Traffic Displays: I-90, Route 3, Route 6
Secratary Davey speaking

MassDOT Secretary and CEO Richard A. Davey and Highway Administrator Frank DePaola announced the deployment of 48 message boards along the Massachusetts Turnpike, Route 3 on the South Shore and the Mid-Cape highway that now display real time traffic information.

“MassDOT is pleased to provide this information to residents and visitors to the Commonwealth,” said Secretary Davey. “We hope they will use this service to add some predictably to their lives and also serve as a reliable resource to help them make decisions on taking alternative routes or using public transit.”

Beyond the real time displays on the highway, the data will be fed to MassDOT’s website and an open data feed for phone app developers will follow in the coming weeks.

The new real time traffic boards will be operating 7-days per week from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. and updated every 3 minutes with new information. A unique identifier and a time stamp are created when a Bluetooth enabled device, like a cell phone in a car, passes one of the road-side detectors. When the device passes a second detector, an algorithm is performed using the time stamps and the unique identifier to arrive at the travel time that is displayed on the boards. A driver’s identity remains anonymous.

Travelers along the I-93 corridor have been receiving this information since last July 4th. The expansion cost $2.2 million and is funded through a combination of toll revenue and state funds. MassDOT’s Highway Operations Center has the ability to override the boards in the event of an extended incident or emergency.


Infrastructure Commission Holds First Public Meeting

The panel charged with exploring Public Private Partnerships to fund certain transportation infrastructure projects held its first public meeting Wednesday.

The new commission created by the legislature as part of Transportation Reform in 2009 is responsible for reviewing and recommending public-private partnership opportunities for transportation infrastructure projects. Public Private Partnerships have been used across the world as an alternative way of procuring and financing projects that would otherwise require taxpayer funding.

“Public Private Partnerships can be a powerful tool for the Commonwealth to work with the private sector to meet our transportation needs,” said Transportation Secretary Richard Davey. “We look forward to working with this distinguished group of experts to develop a strategy for unlocking the potential of private transportation financing while ensuring that the public receives the maximum possible benefit from these collaborative endeavors.”

Chaired by veteran transportation expert Alan Macdonald, the panel also includes former Congressman John Olver, Massachusetts Organization of State Engineers & Scientists President Joseph Dorant, Radcliffe Institute senior project advisor David Luberoff, Valmo Ventures Chair & CEO Valerie Mosley, 495/MetroWest Partnership Deputy Director Jessica Strunkin, and former Boston Transportation Commissioner John Vitagliano.


Cambridge, Newton Bicycle Friendly Communities
bike in traffic

Two additional Massachusetts communities, Cambridge, and Newton, have been recognized as “Bicycle Friendly” by the League of American Bicyclists, the national bicycling organization based in Washington, DC. This is the first year Cambridge was selected, in the coveted Gold category. Newton was previously noted as an Honorable Mention, and has now been recognized in the Bronze bracket.

These communities join Boston (Silver), Arlington, Northampton and Somerville (all Bronze), and Salem (Honorable Mention), which were previously selected.

“We are pleased to see more Massachusetts communities recognized as bicycle friendly,” said MassDOT Secretary Richard A. Davey. “We strive to provide safe, healthy and efficient transportation, and bicycle friendly communities are consistent with our GreenDOT and our Mode Shift goal.” Learn more about MassDOT’s GreenDOT and Mode Shift Goal, and Healthy Transportation Compact.

MassDOT itself has been designated as a Bicycle Friendly Business, and is partnering with Commonwealth communities to improve local bicycling, walking and transit conditions, in order to reduce congestion and greenhouse gases, and to create a healthier and more sustainable state.

Cambridge and Newton were judged on factors, such as bicycling infrastructure improvements, education and public outreach, and staff and police involvement. Making improvements in a number of ways have all added to effectively boosting local bicycling and to attracting more bicyclists.

MassDOT is again very proud to see these important municipal bicycling accomplishments recognized by the League of American Bicyclists. Congratulations to all these Commonwealth communities!

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